Can anyone launch a podcast? Here's how

Mind

Around 7.1 million people in the UK now listen to podcasts each week. That’s one in eight people and is an increase of 24% over the past year – and more than double over the past five years. What’s more, podcasts are lucrative business. Capture the zeitgeist right and cue streams of listeners and advertisers. The best part? Anyone can start one. Oenone Forbat, host of the ‘Adulting‘ podcast talks us through her journey to creating hers…

Want to start your own podcast? Acast Open is the simplest, smartest way to host, share and grow your show. Sign up for free today. Use code DOSE for 6 months’ free subscription to the Influencer or Ace plans on Acast Open.

What did you want to be when you grew up?

Oh wow, a big question. Due to an obsession with Harriet The Spy, I was very keen on becoming a spy myself, that dream actually lasted well into university when I would find myself doing MI5 aptitude tests. It has transpired that I would probably be the worst spy due to my inability to stop talking. I’m not exactly the most inconspicuous person. I also dreamt about becoming a doctor, a lawyer and a singer, however ‘author’ has never once wavered from my dream list. To this day I still hope I’ll be one when I grow up.

Did you feel pressured to go to university?

I’m not sure I felt pressure, it just was sort of a given. I wasn’t totally aware of any other options. I had a very privileged upbringing and going to a private school meant that University was naturally the next step.

What did you learn from going on a gap year?

This was fundamental in my ‘unlearning’ of a lot of privileges that I had grown up with. It was totally eye-opening and instrumental in my move towards becoming fascinated with other peoples’ stories and lives.

Discuss why you became a Personal Trainer whilst still at University…

I had a rather difficult break up at uni and I sought out a Personal Trainer as a means of becoming a ‘new me’ I guess. I started documenting my – rather dramatic- weight loss on Instagram and that was when I started to garner followers. So many people were asking me for advice. I felt as though I could no longer speak on the subject unless I was qualified and so found myself studying for my level 3 Pt, which I completed at the end of my second year.

As a millennial do you think there’s pressure to have lots of side hustles?

I think there may be pressure to have one, but that having one may also alleviate some pressure. Whether that be financially or creatively, I believe as a generation we crave autonomy and financial freedom and being so disenfranchised from the way society is functioning at the minute means that a side-hustle is a great and ‘full of promise’ opportunity.

How has being an influencer with 125k followers impacted your happiness?

Really interesting question. I think if anything my following in itself has no direct correlation to my happiness. However what I have been afforded from carving a career out of Instagram, is priceless. I don’t mean in terms of gifts or #ads, I mean that as a person I have grown so much and learnt so much. It takes discipline and perseverance but I’ve managed to create a career which, for the most part, I love. Job satisfaction has a huge impact on my happiness.

Why did you decide to launch a podcast about ‘adulting’?

Having left university I sort of was under the impression (I assume like many others), that the transition to ‘adulthood’ would be smoother. Initially, the podcast was to be about how to rent a flat/keep your whites white and other mundane tasks… but as the planning process went on, I realised that it was more in the minutiae of life that I was lacking knowledge. Why is the world the way it is? What is feminism? How does the economy work? Etc. These lessons are the foundations which will help me (and hopefully others) to be better adults.

How easy is it to put episodes together?

At the beginning it was tough. I don’t have much of a profile, so getting guests of note took a lot of rejection, perseverance and pestering. Once the podcast garnered more listeners it became easier. In terms of actually editing, I don’t edit them at all anymore. It’s very freeing, I now trust myself enough as an interviewer to not want to pore over every sentence.

What equipment do you need?

I started off using a Zoom H6 Handy Recorder and would record in my flat. This cost me around £300 and at this time that was a big investment. As I got more listeners people started to complain about the sound quality so I now use studios and have a producer. Sometimes I still use my mic but I try not to so as to keep the sound as clear as possible.

How do you go about choosing your guests?

I either have a topic I really want to discuss and then find a relevant expert, or it’ll just be someone whose brain I really want to pick. There is still a lot of grafting and rejection in that department though! I’m also so excited when someone says yes.

Can anyone launch a podcast? If so, what are your top tips…

Absolutely anyone! I would say start as I did. If you can’t afford a mic just record on your phone. The best thing to do is start and then you can ‘level-up’ as time goes on.

When do you think you’ll finally feel like an adult?

I think it comes in waves. Some days I feel really grown up and other days I find myself looking around for someone who looks more adult than me for answers… I assume it’ll always be this way.

Want to start your own podcast? Acast Open is the simplest, smartest way to host, share and grow your show. Sign up for free today. Use code DOSE for 6 months’ free subscription to the Influencer or Ace plans on Acast Open.

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